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Old 08 January 2003, 13:52   #1
Chris@Excal
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Have thermostatic valve that is shut in the "off" position. Have tried shutting down all the rads in the house and forcing the water to this one but no joy. Have tried pulling the plunger up with a pair of pliers.
Mog.... any other bright ideas as I am all out of them, or is replacing it the only solution?
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Old 08 January 2003, 17:41   #2
Mog
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The pin/plunger you are pulling up and down is not actually attached to the stuck item, the only thing you can really do is to try tapping the pin with a hammer when the heating is on to try and shock the valve open, otherwise change the valve which is a 20min job.

Mog
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Old 08 January 2003, 18:29   #3
boomer
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I am getting scared by all these "new valve in 20 minutes" and "ten minutes to fit a radiator" timescales

So what is the secret to changing a valve in only 20 minutes (heck, it takes me that to drain the radiator, let alone the system )??

mb (who is only asking because he need to replace the bit between the valve and the radiator on a few existing units, and still can't imagine how it will take less than 20 minutes each!!!!).
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Old 08 January 2003, 19:01   #4
Mog
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TRADE SECRET TIME...To change a radiator valve in 20mins you work on the principle of ..if you put a beer mat on a pint of lager, turn it upside down and remove said mat then the lager will stay in the glass unless any air is introduced into the top of the glass.(gets very messy).So what you do is go down to the plumbing merchants and buy a rad valve change kit (12.00) which consists of 2 rubber bungs....
1.Turn heating off.
2.Put one rubber bung in or over the vent/expansion pipe.
3.Put the other bung in the cold feed outlet in the header/expansion tank (you have now sealed the heating system thus airlocking it).
4.On the radiator you are working on turn off the valve which you are not changing.
5.Undo the valve you are changing,you will get about 2 cupfulls of water out and then it stops as the water is being held back under the airlock principle.
6.Fit new valve and then fit any others (you must only do one valve at a time)
7.Remove bungs, bleed system and turn on heating.
Hope this helps.

Mog
(I have to say it can get a bit scary when looking at the open ends of the pipework knowing that the system is still full of water......)
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Old 08 January 2003, 19:23   #5
scooby nutter
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chris
tap the side of the valve with a hammer and it usually does the trick.make sure the heating is on.
also what seems to help is to spray wd40 down the pin and keep pulling it up and down gently!!!.Never had to change a radiator thermo yet because its stuck .
but theres always a first time(probably first job in the morning)!!

Duncan
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Old 08 January 2003, 22:07   #6
boomer
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Mog,

thanks for that, although i am on my tenth pint of lager and my beer-mat keeps falling off

But seriously - the technique will also probably help me replace the bit between the valve and the rad, as the same airlock principle will apply (just turn off both rad valves).

When i replaced my rads a few years ago (took a week, but i am crap ) i used telescopic connectors as the new rads were a slightly different size. However, i doubt their longterm (telescopic) capabilities, thus i want to replace them with fixed connectors.

Cheers,

mb
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Old 09 January 2003, 09:19   #7
Chris@Excal
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Tried the hit it with a hammer technique last night with no joy, think it has been stuck down for 2years, so probably need to change the valve, bugger! Will try Mogs suggestion, though the words "a bit daunting" spring to mind!!
Of course sods law now applies as the room has just been made into an office, and guess where the desk with all the computer bits is, yep, right infront of the rad!!!!!
Time to change valve "20 mins!?"
Time to remove computer, desk and reassemble....3 hours!
Chris!
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Old 09 January 2003, 14:34   #8
mj
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to drain a sealed system find the lowesrt drain **** on the pipework and attach hose. open drain ****, give it a few seconds to loose the pressure.
open the bleed screws on the upstairs rads to vent the system.
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Old 09 January 2003, 18:02   #9
Mog
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To airlock an unvented system is even easier as the system is already sealed all you have to do is shut any auto air vents and let off the pressure and away you go...

Mog
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Old 09 January 2003, 18:57   #10
Diesel
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Mog

I saw a kit for freezing solid the water in the pipes to do this kind of jobs.

Cant think they sell many after reading your top tip!

D
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Old 01 September 2003, 14:29   #11
AlexM
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A stupid question for Mog...

How does your trick work if you have an unvented system, i.e. one with an pressure vessel?. In fact, how do you drain an unvented system? I presume that there needs to be somewhere for AIR to enter...

Cheers,

Alex


[Edited by AlexM - 1/9/2003 2:30:58 PM]
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Old 01 September 2003, 14:29
 
 
 
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air, bung, change, drain, kit, rad, radiator, remove, replace, stuck, system, thermostatic, top, unvented, valve, valves


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