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DIY Household DIY, etc

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Old 17 June 2004, 21:19   #1
WILLU
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Default armoured cable?

Whats the best way to take a spur off a socket using armoured cable, need to get power outside for a water feature,( girlfriends idea???). My thinking is that the cable is too bulky to take a spur directly out of the back of a standard socket. I apologise in advance for my stupidity on this one .
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Old 17 June 2004, 21:50   #2
mj
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you shouldn't really be chopping into your existing ring main with an armoured for an external feed unless you are sure you internal ring main is RCD protected.

If you can get all the way to the consumer unit in armoured then do this instead of trying to connect an armoured into your ring main.

Make sure the armouring is well bonded to earth.
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Old 18 June 2004, 08:02   #3
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^^what he said^^

John.
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Old 18 June 2004, 10:22   #4
mj
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out of interest, how far will the water feature be from the house or nearest socket?
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Old 18 June 2004, 10:31   #5
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Good post as im in exact same position, rigged water feature up, burried armoured cable under earth and ran it down to the house. Just got to run it into the house and wire it up. Got to buy circuit breaker and and other fittings yet though.
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Old 18 June 2004, 11:37   #6
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You could just terminate the amoured cable in a metal clad box, then joint to T&E cable..

IF you are going to spur, if just for a water feature.. I would use a decent patress box, and then shove another one next to it with a fused connection unit / spur with built in RCD - then use 2.5 mm T&E to the point of connection..

You MUST use proper cable glands and earth the amouring..

You cut halfway through the amouring with a hacksaw then bend them back to snap them. Incase you didnt know..

Also how you going to terminate the other end of the connection?

I would use a decent IP66 - IP67 box and connect in that using DECENT cable glands.

You shouldnt bury the above!

Also make sure you clip the amoured cable securely and bury it at least 1ft.. Preferably around 1.5 - 2 foot.. but at a minimum deeper than a spade / fork. (regardless of where it runs)

David
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Old 18 June 2004, 11:41   #7
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Top advice !
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Old 19 June 2004, 14:48   #8
WILLU
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Thanks for advice david, mj. Mj the water feature is about 3 metres from the house , and the ring that i will be taking a spur off is rcd protected, just wondered what the best way off joining the new amoured cable was. thanks for the advice.
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Old 19 June 2004, 18:59   #9
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I'll stand to be slated here, but you may not need armored at all, it depends on how much flex is fitted to the water feature - if you have about 5 metres I would suggest you could run the pump flex in some tubing of some sort between the feature and the house - plastic conduit is readily available, and the fittings ( bends etc ) just glue on. I would say this is ok if you are burying it.

Take the tubing as close to the pump as possible, and also butt up to the brickwork of the house ( preferably through the wall ) . Drill a 10mm/25mm hole through the wall of the house underneath the socket,This assumes you can bury the tubing BTW, then drill a small hole through the floorboards and pass the pump flex up through the floor - stick on a plug top with a 3 amp fuse - job done.

I suppose it depends on the cable route - I'm not a housebasher so I'm not rally au-fait with the regs regarding domestic work, but the circuit is RCD'd, and the final fusing is right, the cable is also mechanically protected - if you wanted to go to town on this then get some 1" alcathene water pipe from your plumbers merchant - you'll need a JCB to cut through it
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Old 25 June 2004, 15:22   #10
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The mechanical protection for the cable if it is not armoured has to metallic with a good earth connection e.g. not one to rust or fall off when the strimm goes past it!

better to wire in armoured cable and it must be RCD protected.
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Old 25 June 2004, 16:59   #11
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you cant just use plastic pipe as conduit..

but as adrian says!! also..

Many dwelling houses have buildings associated with them which are not directly part of the main structure. These include garages, greenhouses, summer houses, garden sheds, and so on. Many of them have an installation to provide for lighting and portable appliances. It is important to appreciate that the lightweight (and sometimes temporary) nature of such buildings does not reduce the required standards for the electrical installation. On the contrary, the standards of both the installation and its maintenance may need to be higher to allow for the arduous conditions.

Particular attention must be paid to the following:

1. - supplies to such outbuildings must comply with the requirements for overhead and underground supplies stated in {7.13}, Garden layouts are very likely to change over a period of time, so all cables should be buried to a depth of at least 450 mm with a route marker tape at 150 mm. Cable runs must be recorded on careful drawings, and wherever possible should follow the edges of the garden plot,

2. - the equipment selected and installed must be suitable for the environment in which it is situated. For example, a heater for use in a greenhouse will probably meet levels of humidity, temperature and spraying water not encountered indoors, and should be of a suitably protected type,

3. - the earthing and bonding must be of the highest quality because of the increased danger in outdoor situations. All socket outlets should be protected by 30 mA RCDs.

7.14.2 - Garden installations

Increasing use is being made of electrical supplies in the garden, for pond pumping systems, lighting, power tools and so on. The following points apply:

1. - Socket outlets installed indoors but intended to provide outdoor supplies must be protected by an RCD with a maximum operating current of 30 mA. Any portable equipment not fed from a socket outlet must also be protected by an RCD with a 30 mA operating current. Outdoor sockets also require the same RCD protection and must also satisfy IP44 requirements (see {2.4.3}).

2. - Garden lighting, pond pumps and so on should preferably be of Class Ill construction, supplied from a SELV system and having a safety isolating transformer supply. Where 240 V equipment must be used, it should be Class II double insulated (no earth) and should be suitably protected against the ingress of dust or water. If accessible Class I equipment is used its supply system must have an earth fault loop impedance low enough to allow disconnection within 0.4 s in the event of an earth fault.

3. - Earthing must be given special attention. All buildings must be provided with 30 mA RCD protection, but the Electricity Supply Company should be consulted to ascertain their special requirements if the supply system uses the PME (TN-C-S) system. Where the supplier does not provide an earth terminal, each outbuilding must be provided with an adjacent earth electrode.

4. - Outbuildings are often of light construction and therefore are subject to extremes as far as temperature swings are concerned. It is therefore important to bear this in mind when selecting equipment and components.

5. - Extraneous conductive parts of an outbuilding which may become live due to a fault should be bonded to the incoming protective conductor.

6. - Every outbuilding with an electrical supply should be provided with a means of isolation to disconnect all live conductors including the neutral.

7. - All outbuildings where protection against direct contact is by earthed equipotential bonding and automatic disconnection of the supply should have a disconnection time in the event of an earth fault which does not exceed 0.4 s.

8. - Cables which are not buried must be shielded from direct sunlight, whose ultraviolet content will affect plastics. Cables with ultra-violet protected sheaths may be used; the preferred colour for such cables is black.

9. - Large garden ponds present a particular problem because of the probability that sooner or later people will fall into them. In such a case, the Regulations applying to swimming pools (see {7.3}) should be applied. Pumps and lighting should be SELV with the safety source at least 3.5 m outside the edge of the pond. All cables in the pond must be in ducts or conduits which are built into it and not be allowed to lie loose. All pond equipment must be protected to IP55 (see {2.4.3}) or better.
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Old 25 June 2004, 16:59
 
 
 
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